Problems With Precision and Judgment, but Not Integrity, in Tesla Test

February 19th, 2013 § 0 comments

A follow-up piece by Margaret Sullivan over at the NYT Public Editor’s Journal. She has been covering the Musk vs. NYT showdown since the story broke last week.

Over the past several days, I have questioned and listened to Mr. Broder, Mr. Musk, two key Tesla employees, other Times journalists, the tow-truck driver and his dispatcher, and a Tesla owner in California, among others. …… [A]lthough I do not believe Mr. Broder hoped the drive would end badly. I am convinced that he took on the test drive in good faith, and told the story as he experienced it. Did he use good judgment along the way? Not especially. In particular, decisions he made at a crucial juncture – when he recharged the Model S in Norwich, Conn., a stop forced by the unexpected loss of charge overnight – were certainly instrumental in this saga’s high-drama ending.

She failed to mention what appears to have been some pretty shoddy customer service on Tesla’s part but it’s hard to argue with her conclusion.

In the matter of the Tesla Model S and its now infamous test drive, there is still plenty to argue about and few conclusions that are unassailable.

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